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You may be invited to play in an event at an exclusive facility or may have put together your dream golf trip at some well-known top golf destinations.  In addition to valet parking, bag drops, locker room attendants, cart and beverage cart staff, you may be asked to Golf Tipstake a caddy or forecaddie.  Who do you tip and how much?

The best solution is to ask ahead of time and come prepared to the course with cash (if cash is allowed – some private facilities prohibit the use of cash – all gratuities are billed to a member account).  If invited by a member to play his or her course, you could ask the member the guidelines on tipping, etc.  If you are playing in an event, call the facility and ask the Head Professional or Director of Golf if gratuities are expected and the general guidelines.  They are more likely to provide a suggested gratuity vs. asking the caddy or the caddy master.

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For the second year in a row, the USGA is sponsoring and promoting Play9 ™Day across the U.S.  on Wednesday, July 29.  Launched in 2014, the USGA encourages golfers of all ages and abilities to take time to play 9 holes.  While many non-golfers mention time and money as reasons they don’t play golf, this campaign is designed to encourage people to spend two hours on the golf course playing, vs. not playing at all. 

Play9 DayFormer EWGA Board Member Jon Last from the Sports & Leisure Research Group shares a report with the USGA that states 60 percent of golfers perceive that 9-hole rounds are a great way to introduce non-golfers to the game.  It’s a great way to experience the game, without consuming large amounts of time to play or when time does not allow for an 18-hole round.  Plus many new golfers feel less intimidated by playing 9-holes rather than 18-holes.

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Tags/Keywords:
Functional Area: Board Position / Responsibility : Play9Golf, USGA

I have a friend who is a beginner and needs a nice set of used clubs....and bag.....bag does not have to be orange....but that's a plus......lol, lol!!!!
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Proud of our ladies for our second 2015 volunteer day at Second Harvest Food Bank this weekend. In March, we moved over 6,800 lbs of food, and this Saturday we moved over 5,725 lbs of food in under 2 hours. We've really enjoyed our time in the DEEP FREEZE! Looking forward to our next opportunity as a group in September! Hope those of you who could not make it this time will be able to join us!
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Pace of Play. The three words all golfers get crazy about – you don’t want to be following a slow group on the course and you don’t want to be playing in a slow group on the course. The Rules of Golf Rule 6-7 state that you should “play without undue delay and in accordance with any pace of play guidelines that the committee may establish. Between completion of a hole and playing from the next teeing ground, the player must not unduly delay play.” If you have been invited to play for social or business golf, you want to make sure you are a good guest. While the Rules of Golf don’t state a time limit on playing a stroke, a good rule of thumb is to be ready when it’s your turn, by having your glove on (if you wear one) and having your club selected. You may take a practice swing, then hit your shot. Hopefully this process takes 20 to 30-seconds and not any longer. We’ve all played in a group with a person who takes countless practice swings, then stands over his/her ball before taking a swing. This is what causes slower rounds of golf on the course.

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Well, the mighty clouds of joy came rolling in with a morning shower but we were all there excited and ready to play.  And in about 30 min,  we took off on the roller coaster course ( literally ) and some amazing shots between a rock and a hard place,  we had a ball.   LOL  My teammates, Mary & Dana got us going with a few birdies and some sort of juice.  That juice,  we started rhymes, singing in the rain, making chips off the green, 20ft. putts...it was sweeeet.  So I think I'll give this a try and continue to meet some awesome new friends.   Next up,  I'm getting ready for the TEE CUP FALL League and try to win me a trip to Muscle Shoals, AL on Oct 3 & 4th and the next play date on August 8th.  I can't wait for you to join me...Oh and by the way...Karen and I like our polka dot and zebra shorts.  We got a 100%discount from John Daly's store.   :)

Tee it Up!

Teresa
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Golf carts are a source of revenue for golf courses, so in most instances when you play in a tournament you will be riding in a golf cart.  If you are a new golfer, you may feel more comfortable having a more experienced golfer drive the cart.  The MOST IMPORTANT thing is to make sure your golf bag is fastened securely to the cart.  You don’t want it to fall off – and risk being embarrassed. 

Golf Cart and Push Cart EtiquetteWhen taking a golf cart, the golf staff will let you know if it is “Cart Path Only” (no carts allowed on the course at any time - mainly due to wet fairway conditions).  If the conditions require “Cart Path Only,” take several clubs (plus an extra ball in case yours is lost or not playable) to save time from walking back and forth across the fairway and slowing down play.  If the course specifies “90 Degrees” (drive your cart along the cart path to the spot of your ball and then make a 90 degree turn onto the course and drive to your ball). 

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Most golfers learn early in their golf lessons that it’s important to rake following a bunker shot, but many do not know the correct way to rake a bunker.  (First lesson:  it may feel like a trap, but it’s not called a trap…show your knowledge of the Rules of golf by calling the hazard with sand, a bunker). 

There’s nothing worse Bunker Etiquette and Rakingthan walking up to your ball in a bunker, only to find it in a divot or footprint from another player who was too sloppy to not rake or not rake properly.  Besides practicing good etiquette, it’s something golfers can do to take care of the course. 

Use caution when entering a bunker – enter from the lowest side nearest the golf ball and be careful that you don’t displace sand near the face or the edge of the bunker.  It’s okay to bring a rake into the bunker with you, as long as you don’t rake prior to hitting your shot.  If you encounter someone else’s footprints or a divot, don’t rake that before you hit.  Be sure not to use your club or the rake as a cane to help you when walking into the bunker – an opponent could think you are using your club or the rake as a means to test the soil.  

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Subjects : Bunker, Etiquette, Forecaddie


Protecting Yourself from the SunAs we have recently reached the longest days of the year, that means golfers have more daylight hours to be out playing golf.  It also means we are at a greater risk of skin cancer because we are spending more than four hours in the sun and likely without protection to keep us safe from the suns damaging rays. 

The Skin Cancer Foundation states, “1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer during the course of their lifetime.”  Most dermatologists recommend using sunscreen with SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or higher if you will be out in the sun for extended periods of time.  It’s important to buy sunscreen that’s waterproof as well, since the golf swing, walking and sweating will contribute to the sunscreen wearing off.  Golfers have the added disadvantage of having UV rays reflect back on us from water in hazards and sand in bunkers – so we get hit by the harmful rays twice.

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In 24 hours, I get to start my weekend  @ a golf course in Dickson, TN called  the GreyStone  ( not Grey Goose ) Golf Club w/ some new friends.  I hope that they like to have fun playing in the wide open spaces of fairways and not sandboxes. I like the sand when I'm @ the beach w/ a grey goose in hand.... Can I do the start up call..."TEE IT UP, Ladies or play s song like I used to do when I bowled in tournaments. " Hit Me with Your Best Shot"  I'm excited to meet my new friends, have a few laughs, and who knows maybe watch the birdies fall and soar with the eagles.   

See ya Saturday,

Teresa

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Tags/Keywords:
Functional Area: Board Position / Responsibility : golf score card, womens Golf


Distance Markers on the CourseLast week we talked about the various types of Distance-Measuring Devices for use on the golf course.  What happens if you don’t have a DMD and there isn’t a GPS on your cart?  How do you know the distances?  What do the measurements mean?

Distance markers are a series of disks placed in the fairways of golf courses.  You will usually find these on par 4s and par 5s.  Many courses offer m

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Technology has entered the golf space – not just for equipment and golf balls – but for Distance-Measuring Devices.  How do you select a distance-measuring device and how are they used? 

According to the Rules of Golf, the use of distance-measuring devices (DMDs) – also known as golf rangefinders – has been allowed for use during a round since 2006 only when an optional Local Rule is introduced by a golf course or the committee in charge of a specific competition.  In 2014, the USGA and R&A allowed the use of conforming DMDs in all USGA amateur qualifying events and championships.  This has made the use and popularity of golf rangefinders more common. 

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So you are a “new” golfer -- looking for a guide to playing the game? Or have you been playing golf forever but still feel like a “new” golfer at times? The Den Caddie has some tips to help! Question:   I feel rushed all the time.  How can I play faster? Answer:  Learn to move quickly between your shots will help you play a hole in less time.

The key to playing quickly is to prepare for your next shot while your playing partners are playing. When it is your turn, you have done all your prep work, just hit the ball, without feeling rushed.


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Here’s a great tip to improve pace of play from my PGA Professional colleague Michael Breed, host of Golf Fix on Golf Channel and 2012 PGA Teacher of the Year.  The concept is called “One Club In and One Club Out.”

 
If you are in a riding cart, after you hit the tee ball – get in the cart and ride to your golf ball (holding your driver or whatever club you used to hit the tee shot).  When you get to your ball, put your driver back in the bag and take your next club out (hybrid, iron, wedge, etc.)  You have just put “one club in and taken one club out.”  Ride to your next shot (holding the club you just used) and put your club in the bag and take your next club out (like a wedge and putter.)  Do the same thing at the end of a hole – ride to the next tee with your putter and wedges and put them away when you take your next club out.  The idea is that every time you go to your bag, you are putting one club away while taking the club out for the next shot.

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It seems like every leading golf organization these days refers to themselves by their acronym – we are the EWGA, there’s the PGA, PGA TOUR, LPGA, USGA, NWGA, WGF, NGCOA, ASGCA and GCSAA.  Who are and what do these multiple golf organizations do?  Here’s a quick overview of the various golf associations and the mission: 

The PGA of America (PGA) founded in 1916 is comprised of 27,000 men and women golf Professionals who are recognized as the experts in teaching and growing the game.  These are the men and women who at local golf facilities nationwide – giving lessons, hosting leagues and outings and managing the club.  The PGA of America hosts premier events like the PGA Championship, Senior PGA Championship presented by KitchenAid, Ryder Cup and the PGA Grand Slam of Golf.  Pete Bevacqua is the CEO and The PGA of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. 

The Alphabet Soup of Golf Industry AcronymsThe PGA TOUR

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Our VIM Shopping Extravaganza is Here!
From May 29 - 31 our Chapter Members have access to the amazing Very Important Member (VIM) online shopping opportunity. We can purchase golf products and apparel for only 10% above wholesale! This means a tremendous savings (approx 30 – 60% off) from Cutter & Buck, Bionic Gloves, Clarissa Tumblers, Sundog Eyewear, TourMARK Grips, Golfstream Shoes, Volvik and SkyCaddie
Here’s how take advantage of this opportunity. . . .
› Go to: http://www.myewga.com/vim
› Login using your regular EWGA login.
 If this is your first time accessing the EWGA Member Clubhouse sign in using the email address you have on file with EWGA and enter the default password ‘Password1’ (case sensitive).
 The default password ‘Password1’ is ONLY for members accessing the Member Clubhouse for the fist time. Once in you can set up your personalized password as well as access the VIM.
Remember this is for members only, so if you haven’t joined or renewed yet – get that taken care of ASAP! It would also be smart to set up and test your login before the extravaganza begins. If you have login issues call Noel Pena 800-407-1477 x 30 or email helpdesk@myewga.com.
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I’m sure many of us at one time or another while playing golf have witnessed people giving or asking for advice.  Many golfers may not even realize it’s not permitted in the Rules of Golf.  As you prepare for the EWGA Championship and Cup season, it’s a good time to review what is and is not considered advice. 

According to Rule 8-1 Advice:

During a stipulated rounGiving and Asking for Advice on the Golf Coursed, a player must not:

                a.  give advice to anyone in the competition playing on the course other than his/her partner, or

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Spring and summer weather conditions are often perfect for quick thunderstorms to develop. The National Lightning Safety Institute offers the following information: Lightning is arbitrary, random and unpredictable. Five percent of annual United States lightning deaths and injuries happen on golf courses. Everyone associated with the game should participate in lightning safety.

The United States Golf Association (USGA) makes available warning posters and stickers to inform players about lightning safety tips. As a golfer, you should know that the USGA Rules of Golf (Rule 6-8) allow players to discontinue play if they believe there is a danger from lightning. No other sport has any regulations relating to lightning.

A good rule for everyone is: "If you can see it (lightning), flee it; if you can hear it (thunder), clear it." I have also heard people say, “If you hear thunder, lightning is near.” A few years ago, I had a friend get struck and killed by lightning playing golf on a sunny day – so it isn’t anything to mess with. There is no round of golf so important to risk your life.

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